living your best to the end
Dr. Michael Fratkin is an enabler

Dr. Michael Fratkin is an enabler

“Most of my healing has little to do with medicine.” “My approach has more to do with being there, listening and helping people with a different approach.” Fratkin, entrepreneur creator of Resolution Care,  is a Palliative doctor whose conversations enable people to see things differently The 37-year old alcoholic He gives me an example: “A 37 year old guy who’d almost drunk himself to death – and not for the first time. I knew this patient because he came to us for Rehab. After 10 months of sobriety, he fell of the wagon: Shit happens.” A week ago, this 37 year old had a 75% chance of dying. Two weeks ago, his doctor wanted to change hospitals: “That’s what the family wants.” I was told. Fratkin thought it was crazy, and not medically indicated. “But I didn’t know enough about the situation, so I checked in on him. He was doing better, but was still high risk. I spoke to his mom via video. His mom loves him, and understands him as an alcoholic. Almost killed his liver with hepatitis, but she loves him.  So I asked: What do I need to know – as a parent – to better understand what’s going on, what you’re feeling. And I determined what the family really wants is for him have to have another chance, they want to know how they can help him to survive. Nobody explored that until I spoke to her. 45 min later, he and his mother were able to see things differently. There was healing in the space: if he dies today, there is healing in...

Extreme Measures: Dr Jessica Zitter on a Palliative mission

“I’m going to call 911: a doctor is torturing a patient.” So said Nurse Pat Murphy to Dr Jessica Zitter  – just as Zitter was about to plunge a syringe into the neck of a patient with a host of health issues. Tho the 911 call wasn’t made, it was a turning point for Zitter – who trained as a critical care doctor, and for whom going gently into that good night felt like she was abandoning a patient, a failure. That encounter with Nurse Murphy led her to completely change her own medical ‘mandate’ – becoming a Palliative doctor – the specialty that embodies the philosophy of ‘patient-centered’ medicine. I first ‘met’ Dr Zitter in a New York Times essay in which she admits on her first night on call as a Palliative doctor she hadn’t yet completely relinquished her ‘critical care save the life at all costs’ ‘tude. A healthcare team in conflict The patient ­– a Holocaust survivor ­– was sleeping peacefully. She’d been admitted with pneumonia, but it hadn’t responded to treatment. As she got sicker and her breathing harder, she was made comfortable. The doctor attending the patient told the team gathered that she had clearly said she didn’t want a breathing tube, but the respiratory therapist wasn’t comfortable not intubating: “I’m not really sure she ‘got it’ she was pretty out of it.” Zitter was also unsure. The compromise was to strap on an oxygen mask overnight and re-assess in the morning. The morning found the patient ‘delirious and terrified, her mask off center and totally ineffective.” Confirmation of commitment to Palliative Care...
Vial of LIFE

Vial of LIFE

What is the Vial of LIFE Program It may sound like the fountain of youth, or miracle life-saver in a vial. It is neither. Instead, it’s information about your health care and wishes, stored in your fridge with a fridge sticker to announce its presence. LIFE stands for Lifesaving Information for Emergencies The Vial of LIFE sticker on your fridge alerts Emergency Response Teams (EMS) Paramedics and other health care providers who may come to your home that you have information in your fridge with directions about your health care and wishes. Why Vial of LIFE in the Fridge? In case of fire, your wishes will be preserved. What should be in your Vial of LIFE? There are many templates to help organize and detail your health conditions, concerns, medications and ‘next of kin’ or who to call in the event of an emergency. If you’ve completed Advance Directives such as BestEndings, or have a specific Do Not Revive instructions, a copy can be put with the Vial of LIFE documents. Many’s the time when a medical crisis at home requires emergency services, that too little is known about overall health, health conditions to be aware of (heart, kidney, lung disease or allergies to medicines) to provide proper treatment. A Vial of LIFE sticker on the front door is also recommended Below is a picture of one example of a Vial of LIFE form. To complete follow this link Vial Form Also read: Who’s Important? End of Life Machinery CPR: what does it really mean?...

Dementia – more than memory loss: it’s a broken brain

Dementia: Communication, hard-to-manage behaviours and safety A much needed re-framing of Dementia from Alberta Health Services clinical nurse specialists, Jennette Coats and Loralee Fox, who embrace care and caring for those with ‘broken brains’. I sat in on their extremely practical and sensitive strategy session for supervisors of Home-Care Workers organized by Revera Health Care.Whose patient population increasingly has one or more Dementia: Alzheimer’s, Lewy Body, Fronto-Temporal Lobe, Vascular Attendees included nurses, occupational therapists, social workers, personal support workers and physiotherapists who shared some of their own coping stories, dealing with their own parents with Dementia: “I could tell my mom all the awful stuff about my divorce. She’d forget as soon as I told her – so I got to ‘dump’ without guilt.” As the broken brain description implies, it’s more than just memory loss that caregivers cope with. It’s the responsive b behaviors – aggression, anxiety, agitation, wandering – that drains emotionally and physically. One of the strongest messages acknowledged the issue of time: Caring for someone with violent behaviours of dementia can take 50% more time Staying safe takes time: trying to be efficient can be self-defeating “Rushing through can cause emotional distress and increase anxiety, agitation, and aggression.” From the Gerio Psychiatric Education program in Victoria British Columbia, the acronym, ABCDE Apologies: One of the most powerful the calming strategies I’m sorry – I didn’t mean to upset you. I’m sorry – you’re right. I’m sorry I made you feel (angry, hurt, dismissed..) I’m sorry – I know you’re trying so hard. I’m sorry – this must be so hard for you. One of the...

Coalition for Compassionate Care Summit with ePatients

  ePatients: Engaged and Empowered and Invited The Coalition for Compassionate Care of California (CCCC) promotes high-quality, compassionate care for everyone who is seriously ill or nearing the end of life. What a human-centered, patient-centered goal. And now, the Coalition includes the patient’s point of view –  their  first Summit with ePatients : we who are not afraid to look beyond, ask beyond and search beyond what we’ve heard in doctor’s offices. It’s a given that the ‘e’ includes electronic (email, forums, searches) connectivity after all, in between doctor’s visits patients live their lives, and turn to the digital world for support comfort and information. Palliative approach: ripe for ‘ePatient engagement’ Since Palliative care focuses on all aspects of comfort (or as palliative doc, Daphna Grossman put it: doing ‘Nothing’ is not an option) patients and families have ample time to learn about what may be ahead, and put put mind to what’s important long before the end may seem nigh.  Comfort itself can mean many things, in addition to the all-important pain management.  The palliative approach: perfect opportunity for ‘engagement’. ePatient: Educate and Encourage and Evangelize about Palliative Care Great keynote by #ePatientdave with @KathyKastner in foreground at #cccc16! pic.twitter.com/XEOcpm39ir — Elizabeth Bailey (@PatientPOV) May 12, 2016 This is one of the many reasons I was so over-the-moon at the decision to invite patients to the Summit, and was even more so when I was selected. This, especially so because my fellow ePatients are living with chronic conditions – whether themselves or those they care for – where I am not. Rather I am immersed in the crises,...