living your best to the end

Dr. Michael Fratkin is an enabler

“Most of my healing has little to do with medicine.” “My approach has more to do with being there, listening and helping people with a different approach.” Fratkin, entrepreneur creator of Resolution Care,  is a Palliative doctor whose conversations enable people to see things differently The 37-year old alcoholic He gives me an example: “A 37 year old guy who’d almost drunk himself to death – and not for the first time. I knew this patient because he came to us for Rehab. After 10 months of sobriety, he fell of the wagon: Shit happens.” A week ago, this 37 year old had a 75% chance of dying. Two weeks ago, his doctor wanted to change hospitals: “That’s what the family wants.” I was told. Fratkin thought it was crazy, and not medically indicated. “But I didn’t know enough about the situation, so I checked in on him. He was doing better, but was still high risk. I spoke to his mom via video. His mom loves him, and understands him as an alcoholic. Almost killed his liver with hepatitis, but she loves him.  So I asked: What do I need to know – as a parent – to better understand what’s going on, what you’re feeling. And I determined what the family really wants is for him have to have another chance, they want to know how they can help him to survive. Nobody explored that until I spoke to her. 45 min later, he and his mother were able to see things differently. There was healing in the space: if he dies today, there is healing in...

Dying in the operating room? Rarely happens.

Dying after the operating room is a different story. “People worry about ‘dying poorly’, so one of the reasons for agreeing to surgery is the mistaken belief they’ll likely die – peacefully – in the Operating Room. This rarely happens.” Dr Gretchen Schwarze To understand what can happen even if the surgery or operation is successful, Palliative doctor, Toby Campbell and Surgeon, Gretchen Schwarze feel stories are necessary to paint a picture for ‘consent’.               To illustrate, Dr Schwarze tells this story: “She’s in her late 70’s, with chronic kidney failure and COPD. She’s making it a home with lots of support – but just barely. Now she has an aneurysm, that’s likely going to lead to a medical crisis. Should she have surgery for the aneurysm to prevent the medical crisis?” Using statistics to describe success or failure, her family’s told: 50% chance of not surviving surgery 60% going to need dialysis for renal failure 80% chance going to need ventilator (breathing machine) What the family hears is: 50% chance of survival 40% chance of NOT needing dialysis 20% chance of NOT needing “So, they went for the surgery, took about 8 hours, overall doing well, as best as could be hoped for. When her family came to see her in the ICU, you can imagine what they saw. She was puffy with a breathing tube, with lines and wires and machines. They said, ‘this is not what she would have wanted’ and asked the team to withdraw all supports.” We’ve been so good with innovating in so many areas, communication is...

Palliative Care: Doing ‘nothing’ is not an option

 Dr Daphna Grossman wants to set the record straight “In healthcare it seems we talk about ‘doing everything’ or ‘doing nothing’. With Palliative care ‘nothing’ is not an option. Certainly there are standards and recommendations and then there’s the Art of Treatment: our goal is to treat the whole person – physical, psychological spiritual and social. We look at a person’s goal of care. Can this goal be achieved? Not all illnesses can be cured however, symptoms can be alleviated.” Dr. Grossman is deputy head of the Palliative Care Unit at Baycrest, an internationally respected academic health sciences centre focused on aging, and onsite resident coordinator for their palliative care unit. Her passion for palliative care radiates off her, and she paints this picture: deputy head of the palliative care unit, and site resident coordinator for palliative care. – See more at: http://www.baycrest.org/educate/insights-into-aging-101/presenters-bios/#sthash.yuLPPMKA.dpuf deputy head of the palliative care unit, and site resident coordinator for palliative care. – See more at: http://www.baycrest.org/educate/insights-into-aging-101/presenters-bios/#sthash.yuLPPMKA.dpuf deputy head of the palliative care unit, and site resident coordinator for palliative care. – See more at: http://www.baycrest.org/educate/insights-into-aging-101/presenters-bios/#sthash.yuLPPMKA.dpuf deputy head of the palliative care unit, and site resident coordinator for palliative care. – See more at: http://www.baycrest.org/educate/insights-into-aging-101/presenters-bios/#sthash.yuLPPMKA.dpufHer passion for palliative care radiates off her, paints this picture: “If we only treat patients in terms of their physical issues such as addressing their test results it’s like looking at a picture in black and white. We need to also address the context, the person, who they are, and what is important to them to paint a picture that is in colour.” The thing is, people,often perceive Palliative...