living your best to the end

Comfort: How important is it to you at life’s end?

For many – perhaps most – suffering is the biggest worry about life’s end. Suffering doesn’t start and end with pain management. It includes peace of mind and comfort – both of which are highly individual, and can hold the keys to perception of and requirements for a ‘good death’: What comforts you, or what brings you comfort? What are your small pleasures, or what gives you pleasure?  What brings you peace of mind? Comfort and feeling good about herself is the gift a palliative doctor gave to a terminally ill patient who wanted no further medical treatment. He simply asked: “What would make this a good day for you?” “If I could sing” The patient, Dolly Baker (nee Thelma Botelho), was once a renowned songstress.  And sing she did. I have sat in countless meetings, workshops, think tanks, round-tables where everything but the word, comfort is used to help us on the way to as good a death as possible. Amongst the questions commonly asked: What are your values? What are your beliefs? What’s important to you? What are your goals of care? These may may all play into what makes us feel good,  and brings comfort, but these approaches often then require further probing and questioning which takes so much more of that precious thing that’s often in short supply: health care professionals time. Revealing answers, reveal simple solutions Answers about comfort reveal solutions that: often have nothing to do with medical interventions; can bring comfort and joy to attending healthcare professionals; can help family and friends support more purposefully and meaningfully; As a ‘layperson’ whose focus...

Bringing Creativity into Clinical Practice with Older Adults.

It was a day of music, arts and drama, of passion and compassion, entitled, Bringing Creativity into Clinical Practice with older adults. Bringing creativity into a Clinic Day brought relief and hope to many working with Dementia and Alzheimer’s patients. The presentation was refreshingly unlike most clinical education and on breaks, we were greeted by a Drum Circle, lead by Terri Segal, Expressive Arts Therapist, Not just a demonstration, we were encouraged to pick up a percussion tool and join in. A combination exercise and mental health break. Another presenter – a psychiatrist –  showed photography assignments from nursing home residents, whose average age was 87, entitled: “A View of the World though the eyes of the Elderly: I’m 90 going on middle Age.” One of the photos – a self-portrait assignment – won first prize at an art show: it had been submitted anonymously and the winner surprised everyone when she wheeled over to accept. Robin Glazer, Director of the Creative Center: Arts in healthcare, in NYC was quick to point out that her ‘arts’ are not the same as Art Therapy. “There is no agenda here. It’s de-stressing and fun. We have excellent artists who are flexible and design their approach to the audience. For example, in a group of Japanese elders, our artist started with simple Japanese brush strokes: something they’d be familiar with.” She told of her own experience – which she attributes to honing her observational skills through art appreciation: “I was invited to Grand Rounds at a hospital that one of our artists is at. I saw a young man with an unexplained...