living your best to the end

Four medications cause most hospitalizations

Blood thinners and diabetes drugs – alone or in combination –  cause the most hospitalizations in older adults. This is a really enlightening report picked up by  New York Times, ‘Well’ editor, Tara Parker Pope. Aspirin, clopidogrel and other antiplatelet drugs that help prevent blood clotting were involved in 13 percent of emergency visits. And just behind them were diabetes drugs taken by mouth, called oral hypoglycemic agents, which were implicated in 11 percent of hospitalizations. Two things from the article that struck me:  The medications were all difficult: they require constant monitoring and adjusting. The other thing that struck me: It’s hard to get it right, and downright dangerous to get it wrong.  It’s very delicate business, making adjustments. All these drugs are commonly prescribed to older adults, and they can be hard to use correctly. One problem they share is a narrow therapeutic index, meaning the line between an effective dose and a hazardous one is thin. The sheer extent to which they are involved in hospitalizations among older people, though, was not expected, said Dr. Dan Budnitz, an author of the study and director of the Medication Safety Program at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. SafeMedicationUse.ca – The Institute for Safe Medication Practices Canada’s(ISMP-Canada) medication incident reporting and learning system for consumer has further warnings about insulin : The consumer had recently picked up some boxes of insulin at a pharmacy. Most of the boxes were correct, but one box contained a fast-acting brand of insulin. No one had noticed that the wrong box was mixed in with the other boxes. The consumer reported...

Dr Paula Rochon: Medications and the Elderly

Dr Paula Rochon, Geriatrician,Vice-President Research–Women’s College Research Institute; Adjunct Scientist Kunin-Lunenfeld Applied Research Unit I heard Dr Paula Rochon speak to a small but extremely attentive group of senior seniors. The topic: Medications and the elderly. Rochon is a Geriatrician by training, and her research focus and passion is medication. My take-away: don’t underestimate the impact of medications – the time and effort and challenges required to take ‘em, and the potential effect on other functions. I spoke with Dr. Rochon afterwards, and she clued me in to specific issues related to medications and aging, and a message to pass along to fellow females: Women have to be particularly diligent because so much medication research is done with men. Here’s what I learned: Even if your parent’s been taking the same medication(s) forever, it’s still a good idea to get them reviewed every 4 -6 months. Why? Because aging bodies may not need as much of any one medication. Ask if all medications are necessary, or if any medications can be eliminated If new medication is prescribed, find out what it’s for, if it’s replacing something else, and how it’ll interact with other medications food and drink. Much as weight plays a huge role in how much medication infants are given, as an aging body shrinks, they may not need as much medication. Know your parents weight and height Many medications, or combination of medications can cause confusion, which can lead to a mess o problems: confusion, losing balance and falling, misplacing glasses, dentures, and often –are you ready for this: misdiagnosis of dementia or early Alzheimers. Many pills...