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The ABC’s of AED (Automated External Defibrillator)

An Automated External Defibrillator (AED) is not an Implantable Cardiac Device (ICD) You may have seen them in sports clubs, bars and public transit locations. Unlike an ICD (implantable cardioverter defibrillator), which have been known to keep a person alive even as the body is dying. AEDs Automated External Defibrillator) are external devices that are applied at the discretion of the first responder. If an individual during end of life, who does not want to be resuscitated, dies, those around him or her should respect their wishes and not administer an AED shock. That being said, if the individual isn’t ready to kick the bucket, then an AED is their best chance of survival. Sudden Cardiac Arrest – a heart attack – is a silent killer in an othewise healthy body An AED administers shock to a person experiencing cardiac arrest. The process of applying electric shock to a person suffering cardiac arrest is known as defibrillation. The shock may help the person re-establish his normal heartbeat and can increase the chances of survival. An AED unit is housed in a portable case that contains electrode pads and other equipment. It also contains illustrations of where to place the pads and guides the rescuer with concise and easy-to-understand voice prompts. How It Works Once you turn on the machine, voice prompts will guide you through the defibrillation process. After wiping dry the whole chest area of the victim, apply the two electrode pads to the specific sections of the victim’s chest as indicated in the diagrams. Depending on the model of AED, you may need to plug the connector...